Skip to content

Company types in Estonia

Estonia, a small country located in Northern Europe, has gained a reputation as a thriving hub for entrepreneurship and innovation. The country boasts a business-friendly environment, streamlined bureaucracy, and advanced digital infrastructure, making it an attractive destination for starting and operating businesses. When it comes to the corporate structures of companies in Estonia, several options are available, each with its unique characteristics and advantages.

One of the most common corporate structures in Estonia is the private limited company, known as “osaühing” or “OÜ.” This structure is widely used by both local entrepreneurs and foreign investors. A private limited company provides limited liability to its shareholders, meaning their personal assets are protected in case of business liabilities. The minimum required share capital for establishing an OÜ in Estonia is relatively low, enabling entrepreneurs to start their ventures with ease.

Another corporate structure in Estonia is the public limited company, referred to as “aktsiaselts” or “AS.” Public limited companies are typically larger in scale and often have their shares traded publicly. Unlike private limited companies, the share capital requirements for establishing an AS are higher. AS structures provide a greater opportunity for raising capital through public offerings and are subject to additional regulations and reporting requirements.

In recent years, Estonia has also introduced a unique corporate structure called the e-residency program. E-residency allows non-residents to establish and manage companies online, providing them with access to Estonia’s business environment and e-services. This innovative program has attracted entrepreneurs from around the world, offering them the advantages of operating a company in Estonia remotely.

Additionally, Estonia recognizes other corporate structures such as partnerships and branches of foreign companies. Partnerships, such as general partnerships (TÜ) and limited partnerships (UÜ), allow multiple individuals or entities to join forces and operate a business together. Branches of foreign companies, on the other hand, enable foreign businesses to establish a presence in Estonia without creating a separate legal entity.

It is important to note that regardless of the chosen corporate structure, all companies in Estonia must comply with the country’s legal and regulatory requirements. These include registering the company with the Commercial Register, appointing a local contact person, maintaining proper accounting records, and submitting annual reports.

The corporate structures of companies in Estonia offer entrepreneurs and investors a range of options to suit their specific needs and goals. Whether it’s a private limited company, public limited company, partnership, or a branch of a foreign company, Estonia’s business-friendly environment provides ample opportunities for growth and success.

Private limited company (Osaühing or OÜ)

Private limited companies, known as “osaühing” or “OÜ” in Estonia, are the most common corporate structure chosen by entrepreneurs and investors. This type of company provides a flexible and straightforward framework for conducting business activities while offering limited liability protection to its shareholders.

One of the key advantages of a private limited company is the limited liability it provides. The liability of the shareholders is generally limited to their contributions to the share capital, which means their personal assets are safeguarded in case the company faces financial difficulties or legal obligations. This feature gives entrepreneurs peace of mind and encourages investment in Estonian businesses.

To establish a private limited company in Estonia, a minimum share capital of €0,01 is required.

Private limited companies in Estonia are managed by a management board, which consists of one or more members. The members of the management board can be shareholders or individuals appointed by the shareholders. The management board is responsible for the day-to-day operations of the company, making strategic decisions, representing the company, and ensuring compliance with legal and regulatory requirements.

Another notable aspect of private limited companies in Estonia is the electronic business environment. Estonia is known for its advanced digital infrastructure, and this extends to company management as well. Entrepreneurs can easily establish and manage their private limited companies online through the e-Business Register, which provides a user-friendly platform for various administrative tasks such as registering the company, submitting annual reports, and making changes to company details.

Private limited companies in Estonia enjoy certain tax benefits as well. The country has a competitive corporate income tax rate of 20%, which is applied only when profits are distributed as dividends. Retained earnings, reinvested in the company, are not subject to corporate income tax. This tax-efficient structure encourages businesses to reinvest profits into growth and expansion.

Furthermore, private limited companies in Estonia benefit from the country’s strong rule of law, transparent business environment, and well-developed financial system. These factors contribute to a favorable investment climate and provide a solid foundation for businesses to thrive.

Private limited companies in Estonia offer entrepreneurs a flexible and secure corporate structure. With limited liability protection, relatively low share capital requirements, a digital business environment, and tax advantages, private limited companies are an attractive choice for both local entrepreneurs and foreign investors looking to establish and grow their businesses in Estonia.

Public limited company (Aktsiaselts or AS)

Public limited companies, known as “aktsiaselts” or “AS” in Estonia, are corporate structures designed for larger-scale businesses and those seeking to raise capital through public offerings. Public limited companies offer a range of benefits and opportunities, but also come with additional regulations and reporting requirements.

One of the key features of public limited companies is the ability to raise capital through public offerings of shares. This means that the company can offer its shares to the general public and potentially list them on a stock exchange. By issuing shares to external investors, public limited companies can raise funds for expansion, acquisitions, or other strategic initiatives. This access to public capital markets provides a greater opportunity for growth and development.

Establishing a public limited company in Estonia requires a higher minimum share capital compared to private limited companies. The minimum share capital for an AS is €25,000, and it must be fully paid up before the registration of the company. This requirement ensures that public limited companies have a solid financial base to operate and fulfill their obligations.

Public limited companies in Estonia are governed by a two-tier management structure, consisting of a management board and a supervisory board. The management board is responsible for the day-to-day operations and decision-making of the company, while the supervisory board oversees the management board’s activities, ensures compliance with laws and regulations, and protects the interests of shareholders.

Public limited companies are subject to additional reporting and disclosure requirements compared to private limited companies. They are required to prepare and publish annual reports, which include financial statements and management reports, providing transparency to shareholders and the public. The financial statements must comply with international accounting standards, ensuring high-quality financial reporting.

Another notable aspect of public limited companies is the potential for increased public scrutiny and regulatory oversight. As these companies have a wider shareholder base and potentially trade their shares on stock exchanges, they are subject to regulations and governance standards to protect the interests of shareholders and maintain market integrity.

Estonia’s business-friendly environment extends to public limited companies as well. The country’s digital infrastructure and e-services facilitate the management and administration of these companies. Entrepreneurs can utilize the e-Business Register to register their public limited companies, file necessary reports, and make changes to company information conveniently and efficiently.

Public limited companies in Estonia offer opportunities for raising capital through public offerings and accessing the public markets. With a higher minimum share capital, a two-tier management structure, additional reporting requirements, and potential stock exchange listings, public limited companies provide a framework for larger-scale businesses to grow and expand. Estonia’s supportive business ecosystem and digital infrastructure further enhance the ease of operating public limited companies in the country.

General partnerships (Täisühing or TÜ)

General partnerships, known as “täisühing” or “TÜ” in Estonia, provide a flexible and straightforward corporate structure for individuals or entities to join forces and conduct business together. General partnerships are typically suitable for small-scale businesses and ventures where multiple partners collaborate and share responsibilities.

One of the key features of a general partnership is the shared liability among the partners. In a general partnership, each partner is personally liable for the partnership’s debts and obligations. This means that partners’ personal assets can be used to satisfy any claims against the partnership. It is crucial for partners to have a clear understanding of this shared liability and the potential risks involved before entering into a general partnership agreement.

Establishing a general partnership in Estonia does not require a minimum share capital, making it an accessible option for entrepreneurs with limited financial resources. Instead of contributing capital, partners bring their skills, expertise, labor, or other assets to the partnership. This collaborative approach allows partners to pool their resources and work together to achieve their business goals.

In Estonia, general partnerships are governed by the General Partnership Act. This legislation provides a framework for the rights and responsibilities of partners, profit sharing, decision-making processes, and other important aspects of partnership operations. However, it is important to note that general partnerships do not have a separate legal personality. The partners act collectively and are considered jointly liable for the partnership’s actions and obligations.

The management and decision-making in a general partnership can be structured according to the partnership agreement. Partners can choose to have equal decision-making authority or allocate specific roles and responsibilities to each partner based on their expertise or investment. It is recommended for partners to have a clear and well-documented partnership agreement that outlines the terms and conditions of their collaboration, profit sharing, and dispute resolution mechanisms.

While general partnerships offer flexibility and simplicity, they may have certain limitations. One key limitation is the unlimited liability of partners, which can expose them to personal financial risk. Additionally, general partnerships may face challenges in raising capital compared to other corporate structures, as partners primarily rely on their own resources and networks for financing the partnership’s activities.

General partnerships in Estonia provide a flexible and accessible corporate structure for individuals or entities to collaborate and operate a business together. With shared liability, no minimum share capital requirements, and the ability to leverage each partner’s skills and resources, general partnerships are suitable for small-scale ventures and entrepreneurial projects. However, partners should carefully consider the shared liability aspect and establish a clear partnership agreement to ensure smooth operations and mitigate potential risks.

Limited partnerships (Usaldusühing or UÜ)

Limited partnerships, known as “usaldusühing” or “UÜ” in Estonia, offer a unique corporate structure that allows for a combination of general partners and limited partners. Limited partnerships provide flexibility in terms of management and liability distribution, making them an attractive option for businesses involving both active and passive investors.

One of the distinguishing characteristics of a limited partnership is the distinction between general partners and limited partners. General partners are actively involved in the management and operations of the partnership and bear unlimited liability for the partnership’s debts and obligations. Limited partners, on the other hand, are passive investors who contribute capital to the partnership but have limited liability.

The limited liability of limited partners is a significant advantage of limited partnerships. Limited partners are not personally liable for the partnership’s debts beyond their capital contributions, shielding their personal assets from potential claims or liabilities. This feature makes limited partnerships an appealing option for passive investors who want to participate in a business venture without assuming full personal liability.

Establishing a limited partnership in Estonia requires at least one general partner and one limited partner. The general partner(s) assume full management responsibility and have the authority to bind the partnership legally. Limited partners, on the other hand, are not involved in day-to-day management decisions and typically have limited decision-making authority.

In Estonia, limited partnerships are regulated by the General Partnership Act and the Commercial Code. These laws provide guidelines on the rights and responsibilities of general partners and limited partners, profit distribution, decision-making processes, and other relevant aspects of partnership operations. It is recommended for partners to have a well-drafted partnership agreement that outlines the terms and conditions of their collaboration, including the division of profits and management responsibilities.

Limited partnerships can offer advantages in terms of raising capital as well. Limited partners contribute capital to the partnership, providing a source of financing for the business venture. This allows general partners to leverage the financial resources and expertise of limited partners to support the growth and development of the partnership.

It is important to note that the unlimited liability of general partners can be a potential risk factor. General partners bear personal liability for the partnership’s debts and obligations, and their personal assets may be at stake. Therefore, it is crucial for general partners to carefully assess the risks involved and consider appropriate risk mitigation strategies.

Limited partnerships in Estonia provide a corporate structure that combines general partners with limited partners, offering flexibility in management and liability distribution. With the opportunity for passive investors to participate in a business venture while enjoying limited liability, limited partnerships can attract a diverse range of investors. However, it is essential for partners to have a clear partnership agreement and understand the associated risks to ensure a well-functioning and legally compliant partnership.

Branch of a foreign company

Estonia provides an opportunity for foreign companies to establish a presence and conduct business in the country through branches. A branch is an extension of a foreign company and does not have a separate legal personality from its parent company. This corporate structure allows foreign businesses to expand their operations into Estonia without creating a separate legal entity.

Establishing a branch of a foreign company in Estonia involves registering with the Estonian Commercial Register. The registration process typically requires submitting relevant documentation, such as the parent company’s articles of association, information about the authorized representative in Estonia, and details about the branch’s activities and management structure. The branch must also appoint a contact person who is a resident of Estonia.

One of the advantages of establishing a branch in Estonia is the ability to leverage the reputation and resources of the parent company. By operating under the umbrella of an established foreign entity, the branch can benefit from the parent company’s brand recognition, expertise, and existing customer base. This can facilitate market entry and enhance the branch’s credibility in the local business environment.

Branches of foreign companies in Estonia can engage in a wide range of business activities, subject to compliance with Estonian laws and regulations. They have the freedom to conduct operations in line with the parent company’s scope of activities and can offer products or services to customers within Estonia.

It is important to note that a branch is not considered a separate legal entity, and therefore, the parent company assumes full liability for the branch’s obligations and debts. This means that the parent company’s assets may be at risk in case of any legal or financial issues faced by the branch. It is crucial for foreign companies to carefully consider the potential risks and establish risk management strategies to protect their interests.

From a taxation perspective, branches of foreign companies in Estonia are subject to corporate income tax on the profits generated from activities conducted in Estonia. The parent company is responsible for fulfilling the tax obligations of the branch. It is advisable for foreign companies to consult with tax professionals to ensure compliance with Estonian tax laws and optimize their tax position.

Overall, establishing a branch of a foreign company in Estonia provides an avenue for expanding into the Estonian market without the need to create a separate legal entity. With the advantages of leveraging the parent company’s resources and reputation, branches can quickly establish a presence and engage in business activities. However, it is crucial for foreign companies to carefully assess the associated liabilities and comply with Estonian legal and tax requirements to ensure a successful operation.

Summary

Estonia offers a variety of corporate structures to cater to the diverse needs of businesses, entrepreneurs, and investors. Whether it’s the private limited company (OÜ) providing limited liability and ease of establishment, the public limited company (AS) offering access to public capital markets, the collaborative nature of general partnerships (TÜ) and limited partnerships (UÜ), or the opportunity for foreign companies to establish a presence through branches, Estonia’s corporate landscape supports entrepreneurship, innovation, and growth.

Estonia’s business-friendly environment, digital infrastructure, and streamlined bureaucracy contribute to its reputation as an attractive destination for businesses. The country’s advanced e-services and online platforms simplify administrative tasks, enhance operational efficiency, and facilitate remote management, allowing entrepreneurs to focus on their core business activities.

Furthermore, Estonia’s commitment to transparency, strong rule of law, and investor protection ensure a reliable and trustworthy business environment. The country’s competitive tax system, with favorable rates and incentives for reinvestment, adds another layer of appeal to establish and grow businesses in Estonia.

Whether it’s a local entrepreneur launching a startup, a foreign investor expanding into new markets, or collaborative partnerships pursuing joint ventures, Estonia’s corporate structures provide a solid foundation for success. With the right corporate structure chosen to suit specific goals and requirements, businesses can leverage Estonia’s supportive ecosystem, access capital, benefit from digital innovation, and navigate the global market with confidence.

As the Estonian business landscape continues to evolve and adapt to changing dynamics, entrepreneurs and investors can expect ongoing support, opportunities for collaboration, and a thriving environment that fosters innovation, growth, and prosperity. Estonia’s commitment to entrepreneurship and its progressive corporate structures make it an ideal destination for those seeking to establish and operate successful businesses in the heart of Europe.

Estonian-Chinese Chamber of Commerce

The Estonian-Chinese Chamber of Commerce (EECN) is a non-profit organization dedicated to fostering and enhancing economic, commercial, and cultural ties between Estonia and China.View Author posts

Share this post on social